Discussion Forum


13 March to 17 March 2000

QUESTION 2

HOW DO I KNOW WHICH PARTS OF THE DISCOVERING DEMOCRACY KIT MATCH THE CURRICULUM OUTCOMES IN MY STATE?

DISCOVERING DEMOCRACY UNIT

QUEENSLAND AND VICTORIAN SOSE OUTCOMES

LINKS TO CURRENT TOPICS/PROGRAMS AND ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The Australian Nation

Democratic Struggles – Lower Secondary

1. What is democracy and what was Australia like before we had it?

Who has the vote?

Some key elements of democracy

Secret ballot

Unequally sized electorates

2. How did democracy develop in Britain?

Industrial Revolution

The Chartists’ six points

Chartist speeches

The Chartists’ methods

How the Chartists set about achieving change

What did the Chartists achieve?

3. What influence did the Chartists have on the gold fields and did the struggle at Eureka contribute to the establishment of democracy in Australia?

Eureka stories

Bakery Hill demands

Why the Erueka Rebellion is remembered

The mining game

4. To what extent and when were the Chartists’ six points achieved in Australia?

Achieving democracy in Australia

5. Why didn’t all adults get the vote at Federation and how did those excluded work to achieve it?

The argument about women’s voting rights.

Methods used by women to gain the vote

Suffragist meeting

The Constitution, the Franchise Act 1902 and Aboriginal citizenship

The 1967 Referendum

A timeline of Aboriginal people’s achievement of the right to vote

This unit outlines the Chartists Six Points: vote; ballot; property qualifications; payment of members; equal constituencies; annual parliament. Students are provided with many opportunities of identifying with people at the time and to gain an understanding of the Chartists’ methods. The influences of the Chartists’ movement on activity at Bakery Hill (Eureka rebellion) are investigated. The unit concludes with an analysis of the extent to which the Chartists’ six points have been achieved in Australia.(women’s votes, Aboriginal citizenship).

The CD ROM game where students race the clock to ‘dig for gold’ and deposit it in the right hut is an interesting way of checking understanding of issues linked to the Chartists’ original claims, and the local Australian issues.

Queensland

Level 6

TCC6.1

Students evaluate evidence from the past to demonstrate how such accounts reflect the culture in which they were constructed.

TCC6.3

Students collaboratively identify the values underlying contributions by diverse individuals and groups in Australian or Asian environments.

TCC6.5

Students develop criteria-based judgments about the ethical behaviour of people in the past.

PS6.5

Students make clear links between their values of peace and sustainability and their preferred vision of a place.

CI6.4

Students describe specific instances of cultural change resulting from government legislation or policies that have impacted on other cultural groups.

SRP6.4

Students communicate informed interpretations to suggest reforms to an economic, political or legal system.

SRP6.5

Students apply understandings of social justice and democratic process to suggest ways of improving access to economic, political and legal power.

Level 5

TCC5.2

Students represent situations both before and after a period of rapid change.

TCC5.3

Students collaborate to locate and systematically record information about the contributions of people in diverse past settings.

CI5.1

Students investigate aspects of diverse cultural groups, including Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander groups, and how others perceive these aspects.

CI5.4 Students describe how governments have caused changes to particular cultural groups.

SRP5.5

Students apply the value of social justice to suggest ways of improving access to democracy in Queensland or Australian political settings.

Victoria

Economy and society

  1. Identify key features of Australia’s political system at local, state and federal levels.
  • Identify and trace the history of the key values of representative democracy, including participation, representation, rights and responsibilities

Possible Links

Business

Rights and responsibilities of individuals and organisations. Decision making processes.

Resources

  • No handouts for copying.
  • Stories of Democracy CD ROM. Students look at a cartoon and gain information on the introductio of the Charter to parliament. There are brief segments on the Eureka Rebellion. The mining game requires students to select ‘gold’ or issues and sort them to Chartists and local issues.
  • Parliament at Work CD ROM. The CD involves students in decision making in a fictitious region of Australia where it is possible to manipulate electoral boundaries.

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